Top Ten Tuesday With a Lovely Yellow Hue

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Top Ten Tuesdays started in 2010 on The Broke and the Bookish  and moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January 2018. Make fun lists about literary things using the topics provided, or go rogue and make up your own. Basically, if you’re a bookworm, come booknerd with us!

My favorite color is yellow. It’s the color of sunshine, hope, happiness. It’s an energetic color and it makes me feel positive. Also, I’m pretty laid back, really value loyalty, and live for sweet buttery pastry things. When the Pottermore sorting hat put me in Hufflepuff I was 0% surprised #justandloyal

Here’s a list of books with my favorite color on the cover for you! All photos and descriptions are from Goodreads.

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1. Harry Potter and the Philospher’s Stone 20th Anniversary Edition

Did I get the super yellow Hufflepuff edition? You bet your puffs I did.

“Harry Potter’s life is miserable. His parents are dead and he’s stuck with his heartless relatives, who force him to live in a tiny closet under the stairs. But his fortune changes when he receives a letter that tells him the truth about himself: he’s a wizard. A mysterious visitor rescues him from his relatives and takes him to his new home, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.”

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2. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo

I’m not much for thrillers. This is the only one I’ve ever finished and truly enjoyed.

“It’s about the disappearance forty years ago of Harriet Vanger, a young scion of one of the wealthiest families in Sweden . . . and about her octogenarian uncle, determined to know the truth about what he believes was her murder.
It’s about Mikael Blomkvist, a crusading journalist recently at the wrong end of a libel case, hired to get to the bottom of Harriet’s disappearance . . . and about Lisbeth Salander, a twenty-four-year-old pierced and tattooed genius hacker possessed of the hard-earned wisdom of someone twice her age—and a terrifying capacity for ruthlessness to go with it—who assists Blomkvist with the investigation.”

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3. The Girl With All The Gifts

I haven’t read this one yet but I can’t wait. It sounds like a crazy ride!

“Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class. When they come for her, Sergeant keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair. She thinks they don’t like her. She jokes that she won’t bite, but they don’t laugh.

Melanie loves school. She loves learning about spelling and sums and the world outside the classroom and the children’s cells. She tells her favorite teacher all the things she’ll do when she grows up. Melanie doesn’t know why this makes Miss Justineau look sad.”

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4. Ready Player One

Also on the TBR mountain.

“In the year 2045, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.”

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5. The Rosie Project

This one sounds so cute! I’m excited to get to it.

“Don Tillman, professor of genetics, has never been on a second date. He is a man who can count all his friends on the fingers of one hand, whose lifelong difficulty with social rituals has convinced him that he is simply not wired for romance. So when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a “wonderful” husband, his first reaction is shock. Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and he embarks upon The Wife Project. In the orderly, evidence-based manner with which he approaches all things, Don sets out to find the perfect partner. She will be punctual and logical—most definitely not a barmaid, a smoker, a drinker, or a late-arriver. Yet Rosie Jarman is all these things. She is also beguiling, fiery, intelligent—and on a quest of her own. She is looking for her biological father, a search that a certain DNA expert might be able to help her with. Don’s Wife Project takes a back burner to the Father Project and an unlikely relationship blooms, forcing the scientifically minded geneticist to confront the spontaneous whirlwind that is Rosie—and the realization that love is not always what looks good on paper.”
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6. A Summer to Remember

One of the sweetest reads ever, and I totally recommend it to readers looking to start with Mary Balogh. Her Regency dialogue is accurate, and hilarious.

“Kit Butler is one of London’s most infamous bachelors—marriage is the last thing on his mind. But Kit’s family has other plans. Desperate to thwart his father’s matchmaking, Kit needs a bride…fast. Enter Miss Lauren Edgeworth. A year after being abandoned at the altar, Lauren has determined that marriage is not for her. When these two fiercely independent souls meet, sparks fly—and a deal is hatched. Lauren will masquerade as Kit’s intended if he agrees to provide a passionate, adventurous, unforgettable summer. When summer ends, she will break off the engagement, rendering herself unmarriageable and leaving them both free. Everything is going perfectly—until Kit does the unthinkable: He begins to fall in love. A summer to remember is not enough for him. But how can he convince Lauren to be his…for better, for worse, for the rest of their lives”

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7. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

In the tradition of olde tyme faery tales, bad things happen and not everything ends up sweetness and light. Just one of the reasons I love Roald Dahl.

“Willy Wonka’s famous chocolate factory is opening at last! But only five lucky children will be allowed inside. And the winners are: Augustus Gloop, an enormously fat boy whose hobby is eating; Veruca Salt, a spoiled-rotten brat whose parents are wrapped around her little finger; Violet Beauregarde, a dim-witted gum-chewer with the fastest jaws around; Mike Teavee, a toy pistol-toting gangster-in-training who is obsessed with television; and Charlie Bucket, Our Hero, a boy who is honest and kind, brave and true, and good and ready for the wildest time of his life!”

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8. Winnie The Pooh

There’s a lot of sly, hidden humor in these books. I actually love reading them so much I’m enthusiastically introducing them to my mini bookworms.

“For nearly seventy years, readers have been delighted by the adventures of Christopher Robin and his lovable friends.  Paired with the perfectly suited drawings of Ernest H.  Shepard, A.A. Milne’s classic story continues to captivate children of all ages.”

 

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9. Pride and Prejudice

Surprise! The Penguin Classics clothbound edition is yellow. Because even Penguin knows that yellow rocks.

“When Elizabeth Bennet first meets eligible bachelor Fitzwilliam Darcy, she thinks him arrogant and conceited; he is indifferent to her good looks and lively mind. When she later discovers that Darcy has involved himself in the troubled relationship between his friend Bingley and her beloved sister Jane, she is determined to dislike him more than ever. In the sparkling comedy of manners that follows, Jane Austen shows the folly of judging by first impressions and superbly evokes the friendships,gossip and snobberies of provincial middle-class life.”

 

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10. The Hunger Games

This last one only has yellow *on* the cover, if we’re being strictly accurate, but what kind of Hufflepuff would I be if I didn’t include the house colors? I also just really love the Hunger Games trilogy. Team Peeta, all the way.

“The nation of Panem, formed from a post-apocalyptic North America, is a country that consists of a wealthy Capitol region surrounded by 12 poorer districts. Early in its history, a rebellion led by a 13th district against the Capitol resulted in its destruction and the creation of an annual televised event known as the Hunger Games. In punishment, and as a reminder of the power and grace of the Capitol, each district must yield one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 through a lottery system to participate in the games. The ‘tributes’ are chosen during the annual Reaping and are forced to fight to the death, leaving only one survivor to claim victory.

When 16-year-old Katniss’s young sister, Prim, is selected as District 12’s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart Peeta, are pitted against bigger, stronger representatives, some of whom have trained for this their whole lives, she sees it as a death sentence. But Katniss has been close to death before. For her, survival is second nature.”

 

10 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday With a Lovely Yellow Hue

    1. It’s more common than I thought! I predicted I’d have to look really hard to find any books and then there were lots 🙂

    1. Since I’m pretty sure I’m going to love those two as well, I’m just going to say you have great taste in books! Haha

  1. I am not always into books with romance as the primary plot device, but I did very much enjoy The Rosie Project! It’s very charming.

  2. What an interesting and fun article. I never thought about it but now I think the covers with white, blue and orange attract more my attention. Wish you an yellow day😊

    1. There’s an idea for your own blog post then 🙂 It could be fun. Those colors would be pretty interesting all together!

      1. Lol 😊 I was just thinking about it though I think I could tend to go too wide. White cover…hmmm… . It is too often used. Why didn’t my taste chose only one color, blue for example, so that it would be easier for me to narrow down the list?

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